top of page

Winter Storm warning 12/22/22

SCS plans to be closed on Thursday and Friday (12/22 and 12/23) due to the Winter weather warning issued by the National Weather Service.

SCS is taking this action for the consideration and protection of our staff, volunteers and most importantly the persons who use our services.

Thank you for your understanding and patience. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause.

p.s. PLEASE PLEASE do not leave any donated food or household items outside of our building. The items will become TRASH due to the weather.


Kyle Palmer Shawnee Mission Post Dec 21, 2022 - Weather

Winter storm looms — What you need to know in Johnson County

Driving: The National Weather Service recommends that you not drive on Thursday.

· If you have to drive, the American Red Cross encourages you to pack an emergency kit with medical supplies, an ice scraper, extra clothing and blankets and bottled water.

· If you know you’ll have to drive Thursday, make sure your gas tank is full.

· As always when it’s icy or snowy, drive slowly and keep plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.


Latest forecast: The National Weather Service’s Kansas City field office says many local areas can expect between two to four inches of snow. (Nothing like a record-setting snow blast in February.)

· More concerning are the wind chills, which could plummet to -40 degrees Thursday.

· Wind gusts Thursday are also expected to create blizzard-like conditions and blowing snow, making driving a challenge.

Timing: The NWS says snow could begin falling as early as 9 p.m Wednesday night and continue through Thursday.

· Blowing snow and high winds with gusts up to 40 miles per hour are expected to really kick in around midday Thursday.

· The current winter storm warning expires at midnight Friday.

Duration: Snow is expected to end by Friday but a wind chill warning will stay in effect through noon Saturday.

· Wind chills could remain well below zero on Friday, Saturday and on Sunday, which is Christmas Day.

Municipal snow crews are expected to be out starting Wednesday night, treating roads ahead of the winter storm. Photo via Overland Park.

Staying safe during winter storm

Going outside: People are encouraged to stay inside as much as possible, but if you do go outside, bundle up with an insulated, waterproof layer of clothing on top.

· Wear a hat, gloves and scarf to avoid loss of body heat and protect your fingers and ears.

· Cover your mouth to avoid breathing in icy air.

· In such extremely cold conditions like we’ll see this week, a person can suffer frostbite in less than 30 minutes outdoors.

Driving: The National Weather Service recommends that you not drive on Thursday.

· If you have to drive, the American Red Cross encourages you to pack an emergency kit with medical supplies, an ice scraper, extra clothing and blankets and bottled water.

· If you know you’ll have to drive Thursday, make sure your gas tank is full.

· As always when it’s icy or snowy, drive slowly and keep plenty of distance between you and other vehicles.

Be safe at home: Even at home, wear warm, loose-fitting clothes in layers.

· Gather blankets ahead of time in order to bundle up more if you get cold.

· Take stock of your medication before the storm hits and get any refills you need.

· If you have a space heater, try to place it on a hard, level, nonflammable surface (like a tile floor) and don’t leave it unattended for long periods.

· If you start a fire, the Red Cross recommends you keep a metal or glass screen in front of the fireplace.

· Avoid using a gas range or stovetop to heat your home.

Freezing pipes: Open kitchen and bathroom cabinets to allow warmer air to circulate around plumping. Let cold water drip from faucets connected to pipes near the exterior of your home to prevent water from freezing inside the pipes. If you turn on a faucet and water comes out at a trickle, your pipes may be frozen: you can use a heating pad, space heater or hair dryer to warm up a frozen section of pipe.

Watch your pets: When it’s this cold, the ASPCA says pets should come indoors as much as possible. If pets do remain outdoors, make sure they have access to an enclosed shelter and non-frozen water. The Red Cross says pets can also get hypothermia, and symptoms can include: whining, shivering, being anxious, slower than usual or stops moving, seems weak or starts looking for warm places to burrow.

· Have enough food, water and medicine on hand for your pets to last a few days if you can’t go out or get to a vet.

Featured Posts
Recent Posts